The Parliament Prize 2021 - Tips for presenting to camera

Presenting to camera

It’s official, our annual Parliament Prize competition officially opened this week. Over the last few months we've been developing resources to help you make the most of this learning opportunity in your classroom.

In earlier entries here on the Springboard blog, we provided some ideas to help students identify and research a topic for the Parliament Prize competition. In this edition, we've provided some tips about speaking to camera that aim to help students develop and expand their skills to produce a 90 second video on their issue or topic of choice.

At Parliament we are lucky to have access to a team of experienced journalists and broadcasting specialists. When assembling this resource, we sat down with Bill Bainbridge a Communications Advisor at the Victorian Parliament. Bill has also been a producer, reporter, and presenter with the ABC Asia Pacific Newsroom. We asked what advice he had for filming a video and speaking to camera, and he offered some useful insightful tips and suggestions to make a standout video for the competition.

In the video below, Bill talks about the importance of understanding the key points to get across and emphasizing certain words, using a natural tone of voice, maintaining eye-contact with the camera and thinking about the location and setting of where the video will be filmed.

 

 

Filming your presentation

  • It’s really important that we can hear clearly what you say so minimise background noise. Outside can look great, but the wind can make it really hard to hear even if it doesn’t seem that windy. Watch your video back to make sure you can understand everything.
  • Think about how your background might be able to compliment what you are saying. If in doubt, filming against a plain wall can work.
  • Practice a couple of times to make sure you can keep to the 90 second time limit.
  • The ACMI website has lots of information about filming that you might find helpful. There are lots of explanations on their Film It page that looks at shot types, camera angles, sound recording, and if you want to get creative, visual effects too.
  • While a Member Statement is usually an MP talking to the chamber, if you’ve got an idea to creatively produce your video that’s good too. Bring your personality and just make sure your message is clear.

 

Submitting your entry

  • Before you submit, make sure your file can be played on another computer or device – your friend’s, parent’s, or teacher’s device might be a good option.
  • MP4 or MOV file types tend to be transferable to different devices, if possible, try to select one of these file types.
  • Check the Terms and Conditions with your Parents. If submitting as part of school/classroom activity your teachers should talk to you about this.
  • Make sure you put the correct email address and your full school name, campus (if applicable), including a link to the school website. This helps us find you and your school if we need to contact you. If you are a home-schooled you can still participate, please identify that you are home schooled.
  • Submit your entry well before the deadline. Sometimes files can take a long time to upload.
  • You’ll receive an email confirming your entry.

 

Entries to the Parliament Prize are open until Friday 30 July 2021. Prizes will be awarded to the winners and their schools in three categories: grades 5 and 6; years 7 to 9; and years 10 to 12.